Heritage Sunday 2002
Heritage Sunday
Reformation Sunday
Celebrate
Church Historian
Writing congregation histories
Exhibits
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Korean text: Matt. 10:7: 'Go and proclaim...' Witness the Good News: Our Mission Heritage in Korea

Download resources in Adobe Acrobat format:
2002 bulletin cover | children's activity page
mission crossword puzzle | mission puzzle key

More Information Online: To learn more about the Presbyterian missionary heritage in Korea, view this online exhibition illustrated with photographs from the PHS collections, or consult the books on the reading list.


Horace N. Allen
(1858-1932)
Click photo for enlargement
The Prince is dying! In 1884, the word spread throughout Seoul. Rebels had murdered several government leaders, and Prince Min Jong-ik was bleeding from seven sword wounds. Desperate officials called for Dr. Horace N. Allen, physician to the foreign diplomats in Korea. Under his care, the prince made an amazing recovery. In a land where Christianity was outlawed, the skill of Dr. Allen, the first Presbyterian missionary in Korea, opened the door for missions. By 1907, twenty-three years after AllenÌs arrival, the mission boasted a seminary, hospitals, clinics, schools from primary to college levelÒand a fully organized Korean presbytery working under the principles of self-support, self-government, and self-propagation.


Dr. Mattie Tate
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American Presbyterians such as the Rev. Horace G. UnderwoodÒwho in 1886 baptized the first Presbyterian Korean convertÒand Mattie Ingold Tate, physician, evangelist, and educator, worked with Korean Presbyterians to help create a large and vibrant Christian community in Korea despite decades of hardship and oppression. The story continues; five generations of the Underwood family served as missionaries in Korea, and missionaries from the Presbyterian Church of Korea are currently working in 80 countries.

Presbyterian Heritage Sunday has been set aside by the General Assembly of the PC(USA) as an annual day to celebrate, reflect upon, and learn more about the long and rich history of Presbyterianism. It falls on the Sunday closest to May 21, the date of the opening of the first General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America in 1789.

The Presbyterian Historical Society supports Heritage Sunday by preparing study and worship suggestions for distribution to congregations throughout the United States.